Market to and Recruit Future Entrepreneurs

GMAC® market intelligence can help you attract emerging entrepreneurs to your programs.

More than 11,000 GMAT® test takers indicated entrepreneurship as their intended concentration in Testing Year 2015.

More Entrepreneurs See Business School as Crucial to Their Success

Entrepreneurs, job creators, risk takers: Call them what you want, but increasingly these business builders look to business schools and management programs to develop their skills, and schools have responded. The odds of succeeding as an entrepreneur can be steep, but business schools teach the skills that can help entrepreneurs make sound decisions and avoid expensive mistakes.   

Interest in Entrepreneurship Specialization Continues to Grow

  • Out of the 210,897 GMAT exams taken in testing year 2106 in which test takers selected an intended concentration, more than 11,000 indicated Entrepreneurship. That’s 5 percent of all those who indicated a concentration when they sat for the GMAT exam, the worldwide admissions exam for graduate management study.
  • All graduate business schools have courses, programs, or other offerings for entrepreneurs. Currently, there are 70 programs with entrepreneurship in the program title with codes to accept the GMAT exam and nearly 600 programs in the mba.com school search service that offer Entrepreneurship as an area of elective study or concentration.
  • Forty Masters in Entrepreneurship programs received GMAT score reports in 2016, up from 18 five years ago.

Source: GMAT testing data, July 1, 2015 to June 30 2016.


Connect with Aspiring Entrepreneurs in Three Steps

Step 1: Expand your reach to prospects interested in entrepreneurship. 

Record number of GMAT test takers intend to concentrate on entrepreneurship. Our research products and GMAT exam testing data, available only from GMAC, can help you find these test takers and discover what they hope to gain from business school.
  • Recruit Precisely: Use our robust GMASS Search Service tool to connect with candidates who have indicated their interest in entrepreneurship as the focus of their graduate education.
  • Leverage Our Research: Use GMAC data to inform your outreach strategies and GMASS searches. Explore these reports:
    • Get valuable information about the needs, motivations, behaviors, and program choices expressed by more than 2,500 prospective students focused on entrepreneurship as their intended employment outcome. Explore this special interactive report from our 2016 mba.com Prospective Students Survey.
    • Currently, 12 percent of business school alumni who provided current employment data to the 2015 Alumni Perspectives Survey report they are self-employed. Read the “Self-Employed” section of the 2016 Alumni Perspectives Survey for details by key career attributes, educational outcomes, work location, and job attributes of entrepreneurs.

Step 2: Get a GMAT code for your entrepreneurship program so students can find you.

If you already have an entrepreneurship program or plan to start one, consider obtaining a separate GMAT code for it so students interested in entrepreneurship programs can send their GMAT score results directly to your program. Properly cataloging all our programs by type makes it easier for students to find you and increases your potential for connecting with students who offer the right fit for your programs.

Step 3: Promote entrepreneurship to your students.

Your school’s website is the information source with the greatest impact for a prospect’s decision-making, according to survey findings from the mba.com Prospective Students Survey. We invite your school’s admissions, marketing, communications, and web teams to take advantage of the following materials to get the most out of your school’s outreach efforts. Embed the resources below to promote the value of an MBA to future entrepreneurs.

GMAC looks forward to commemorating Global Entrepreneurship Week, November 14 to 20, 2016.