Full Author Bios for Disrupt or Be Disrupted: A Blueprint for Change in Management Education

Author Biographies

J. Ben Arbaugh, Jean Bartunek, Kenneth G. Brown, Erich Dierdorff, Michael Hay, Brooks Holtom, George A. Hrivnak, Dipak Jain, Subhash Jain, Jikyeong Kang, Amy L. Kenworthy, Rakesh Khurana, Frederick P. Morgeson, Denis J. Nayden, Lyman W. Porter, Robert S. Rubin, Sara L. Rynes-Weller, J.C. SpenderAndrew Stark 

J. Ben Arbaugh

J. Ben Arbaugh
Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Co-Author: Overlooked and Unappreciated: What Research Tells Us About How Teaching Must Change (Chapter 6)

J. B. (Ben) Arbaugh is Professor of Management in the College of Business (COB) at the University of Wisconsin (UW) Oshkosh. His published research has appeared in leading management and educational research journals such as Academy of Management Learning & Education, Computers & Education, Management Learning, The Internet and Higher Education, and the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks. From 2009 to 2011, he was editor of Academy of Management Learning & Education and chaired the Management Education and Development Division of the Academy of Management in 2006–2007. He is a six-time Academy of Management Division Best Paper Award winner and winner of Best Article Awards with both the Journal of Management Education and the Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education. He also serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Management Education, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, The Internet and Higher Education, and Organization Management Journal.

Dr. Arbaugh’s research in graduate management education has focused primarily on the delivery of management education via the Internet, with particular emphasis on online course design and the influence of academic disciplines on online course outcomes, for which he received a GMAC Management Education Research Institute (MERI) faculty fellowship in 2009. He also has received MERI grants for research on career transitions of MBA graduates, women and minorities in MBA programs, and regional influences on attitudes toward MBA education. Other research interests include research methods in management education, project management, organizational growth transitions, and international entrepreneurship.

In 2011, Dr. Arbaugh became the first UW Oshkosh College of Business faculty member since 1992 to be named a John McNaughton Rosebush Professor, UW Oshkosh’s highest faculty award. His other teaching honors include the 2008 Outstanding COB Graduate Faculty Award, the 2009 Management and Human Resources Department Teaching Award, and the 2012 UW Online MBA Consortium Outstanding Faculty Award. Outside the university, he has worked with organizations such as the Hazelden Foundation and the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education in the areas of project management and online teaching and learning.    top of page

Jean Bartunek

Jean Bartunek
Robert A. and Evelyn J. Ferris Chair and Professor, Boston College

Co-Author: Curriculum Matters: Toward a More Holistic Graduate Management Education (Chapter 5)

Jean M. Bartunek is the Robert A. and Evelyn J. Ferris Chair and Professor of Management and Organization at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College, where she has taught since 1977. Her bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology is from Maryville University (St. Louis), where she has served on the board of trustees since 2003. Her PhD in social and organizational psychology is from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a past president and fellow of the Academy of Management and in 2009 won the Academy’s Career Distinguished Service Award. From 2008 to 2010, she was a visiting international fellow of the Advanced Institute for Management Research in the United Kingdom.

Dr. Bartunek has published more than 125 journal articles and book chapters, as well as five books: Creating Alternative Realities at Work: The Quality of Worklife Experiment at Foodcom (coauthored with Michael Moch), Hidden Conflict in Organizations: Uncovering Behind-the-Scenes Disputes (coedited with Deborah Kolb), Insider-Outsider Team Research (coauthored with Meryl Louis), Organizational and Educational Change: The Life and Role of a Change Agent Group , and Church Ethics and Its Organizational Context: Learnings From the Sex Abuse Scandal in the Catholic Church (coedited with Mary Ann Hinsdale and James Keenan). Her work has won best paper awards from the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science and Human Relations. Her primary research interests center around organizational change and academic–practitioner relationships. This latter interest includes how academic knowledge can be “translated” for practitioners, including students in management classes.

Dr. Bartunek is an associate editor of the Academy of Management Learning & Education and the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. She serves, or has served, on the editorial boards of multiple journals, such as the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Studies, the Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Human Relations. She previously was a coeditor for the nontraditional research section of the Journal of Management Inquiry (1994–1997) and an associate editor of Advances in Qualitative Organizational Research (1998–2004). She has also coedited special research forums in the Academy of Management Journal (1993, 2001) and Academy of Management Review (2007, 2012).    top of page

Kenneth Brown

Kenneth G. Brown
Professor and Henry B. Tippie Research Fellow, University of Iowa

Co-Author: Overlooked and Unappreciated: What Research Tells Us About How Teaching Must Change (Chapter 6)

Kenneth G. Brown, PhD, SPHR, is currently Professor and Henry B. Tippie Research Fellow in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. He conducts research on learning and motivation in workplace training and development, with an emphasis on technology-mediated learning environments. He also studies the science–practice gap as it relates to management policy and practice. His published work has appeared in journals such as Academy of Management Executive, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Human Resource Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personnel Psychology, and in a number of edited books. He is coauthor (with Greg Stewart) of the human resources textbook, Human Resource Management: Linking Strategy to Practice.

Dr. Brown has received research awards from the American Society of Training and Development and the Society of Human Resource Management for his research on technology-mediated training programs, as well as best paper awards from Human Resource Management and the Academy of Management Learning & Education. He has served on the editorial boards of Academy of Management Review, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Human Resource Development Quarterly, Human Resource Management, Journal of Management, Organization Management Journal, and Personnel Psychology. After serving a term as associate editor of Academy of Management Learning & Education from 2009 to 2011, he was appointed editor for 2012–2015.

Dr. Brown’s teaching experiences include courses in human resources, organizational behavior, and general management across undergraduate, master, and doctoral levels. He currently teaches the mandatory, large-enrollment management course for undergraduates in the Tippie College. He is the recipient of numerous teaching awards, including the Dean’s Teaching Award, the Collegiate Teaching Award, the President and Provost Award for Teaching Excellence, and (twice) the college’s annual “Student’s Choice for Faculty Excellence Award.” The University of Iowa student body chose Dr. Brown to give the “Last Lecture” in 2011. The Institution for the Carnegie Foundation also nominated him three times for the US Professors of the Year Program.    top of page

Erich Dierdorff

Erich Dierdorff
Associate Professor, DePaul University

Co-Author: Building the Case for Graduate Management Education: Ensuring and Enhancing Future Value (Chapter 1)
Co-Author: Epilogue

Erich C. Dierdorff is an Associate Professor of Management in the Driehaus College of Business at DePaul University in Chicago. His published research has appeared in leading management journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and The Leadership Quarterly, among others. Dr. Dierdorff serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Human Performance, and Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies. He has also contributed to numerous industry and press outlets (e.g., Bloomberg Businessweek, Financial Times, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Washington Post).

His research in graduate management education has focused on curricular challenges facing contemporary schools of business, and specifically on issues of “real-world” relevancy. This latter research topic has been funded by research grants awarded through the GMAC Management Education Research Institute. Other research interests include improving the effectiveness of individual- and team-level learning, examining the predictors and consequences of organizational citizenship, and studying contextual factors that affect work analysis, work design, and performance effectiveness.

Dr. Dierdorff has received several awards for teaching excellence at both the undergraduate and graduate levels of business education. Outside the university, he has consulted with both private and public-sector organizations in areas of human capital development such as strategic workforce development, selection system design, training effectiveness, and leadership development. He has performed this work with such organizations as Nortel Networks, Siemens Systems, Law School Admission Council, US Department of Labor, North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, and the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages.    top of page

Daniel Feldman

Daniel Feldman
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, University of Georgia

Author: Student Engagement: Selection, Management, and Outcomes (Chapter 7)

Daniel Feldman is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Synovus Chair of Servant Leadership at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. He has served on the faculties of Yale College, the University of Minnesota Industrial Relations Center, Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, University of Florida, as the James Bradley Distinguished Foundation Fellow at the University of South Carolina’s Moore School of Business, and as a Visiting Sloan Scholar at MIT. He received his MA in administrative sciences and his PhD in organizational behavior at Yale University Graduate School.

Dr. Feldman has written six books and more than 125 articles on career development and career management. His coauthored book, Coping With Job Loss: How Individuals, Organizations, and Communities Respond to Layoffs, was named one of the four outstanding books of the year by the Academy of Management, and his work on job loss has been cited in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. In 1997, he was the recipient of USC’s Educational Foundation Research Award for being the outstanding researcher in the professional schools. He has also won a J. L. Kellogg Research Professorship for his work on socialization and job change, a CIBER Fellowship for his work on expatriation, a Riegel and Emory Fellowship for his work on downsizing, the Addison-Wesley Best Paper Award from the Academy of Management for his work on early retirement incentives, the Cason Hall Best Paper Award for his work on part-time employment, and the Careers Division Best Paper Award for his work on early career indecision.

Professor Feldman has won numerous teaching awards, including the MBA Teacher of the Year award, which he won five times at the University of Florida. At USC, he received the Alfred G. Smith Award for Teaching Excellence (outstanding teacher in the Moore School of Business) and the Michael A. Hill Distinguished Faculty Award (outstanding teacher in the Honors College), and was named an Eli Lilly Senior Teaching Fellow (university-level award). At the University of Georgia, he won an outstanding teacher award in 2005. He has led executive education programs at firms such as Honeywell, Milliken, J.C. Penney, Knight-Ridder, the US Health Care Finance Administration, American Red Cross, AMA, and Duke Energy.    top of page

Michael Hay

Michael Hay
Professor, London Business School

Author: Framing and Making Strategic Choices (Chapter 2)

Michael Hay is Professor of Management Practice in Strategic and International Management and Entrepreneurship at London Business School. He was deputy dean and secretary of the school for five years until December 2006 and acting dean of CIDA City Campus in Johannesburg, South Africa in 2007. CIDA is an innovative institution that provides virtually free undergraduate business education to historically disadvantaged individuals.

Professor Hay joined the London Business School faculty in 1987 and has held a variety of positions, including director of the Foundation of Entrepreneurial Management, associate dean of the Sloan Master’s Program, and dean of executive education. He previously spent 10 years in academic publishing, principally with Blackwell, where he was deputy managing director of Blackwell Publishers, a founder and chair of Blackwell-Polity, and chairman/chief executive of Marston Book Services; and director of The Business Place in South Africa.

Professor Hay is cofounder of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor which, starting with 10 countries in 1999, now examines the nature and impact of entrepreneurial activity in more than 50 countries around the world. His books include The Strategy Handbook, with Peter Williamson; Investing for the Future: New Firm Funding in Germany, Japan, the UK and USA with Steven Abbott; and The Venture Capital Handbook with Bill Bygrave and Jos Peeters. He has worked as a consultant for the United Nations on welfare in Eastern Europe and coauthored, with Professor Sir Alan Peacock, Social Policies in the Transition to a Market Economy.    top of page

Brooks Holtom

Brooks Holtom
Associate Professor, Georgetown University

Co-Author: The Change Imperative (Introduction)
Co-Author: Epilogue

Brooks Holtom is Associate Professor of Management at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. He taught previously at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University as well as at the College of Business Administration at Marquette University. He has been a visiting professor at the Munich School of Management, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität (Germany), Institut d’Economie Scientifique Et de Gestion, l’Université Catholique de Lille (France), and Colegio de Administración para el Desarrollo, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (Ecuador).

Dr. Holtom’s research focuses on how organizations acquire, develop, and retain human and social capital. His more than 50 published articles have appeared in premier management journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, International Journal of Human Resource Management, and others. He has been a board member for a number of top journals (e.g., Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Human Decision Processes) and received awards for this service. His thinking has appeared in many media outlets including Bloomberg Businessweek, The Chicago Tribune, Harvard Management Update, The New York Times, the Toronto Globe and Mail, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, CBS, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and NPR.

Dr. Holtom received BS and master’s degrees in accounting from Brigham Young University. He worked several years for a large accounting firm in Seattle, Washington, where he was licensed as a CPA, and then completed his PhD in organizational behavior and human resource management at the University of Washington.    top of page

George Hrivnak

George A. Hrivnak
Assistant Professor, Bond University

Co-Author: Overlooked and Unappreciated: What Research Tells Us About How Teaching Must Change (Chapter 6)

George Hrivnak is an Assistant Professor of Management at Bond University in Queensland, Australia. His research focuses on management education and development, including leadership development, experiential learning, instructional design and assessment, and transfer of learning. He and his colleagues have published their work in the Journal of International Management, Journal of Management Education, International Journal of Organizational Analysis, and Small Group Research, and have published several book chapters and conference papers.

He is an editorial board member of Academy of Management Learning & Education and a board member of Bond University’s Centre for Applied Research in Learning, Engagement, Andragogy & Pedagogy. Dr. Hrivnak is an award-winning teacher who teaches at the undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels regarding topics that include negotiation, leadership, organizational behavior, change management, and human resources management.    top of page

Dipak Jain

Dipak Jain
Former Dean, INSEAD

Co-Author: Building the Case for Graduate Management Education: Ensuring and Enhancing Future Value (Chapter 1)

Dipak Jain is the former Dean of the international business school INSEAD, a position he held from March 2011 to March of 2013. Dr. Jain previously served as dean of Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management from 2001 to 2009. He joined the Kellogg School of Management faculty in 1986 as an associate professor and became an associate dean in 1996. In 1994, he was named the school’s Sandy and Morton Goldman Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies and professor of marketing. He currently continues his role at INSEAD as professor of marketing.

In addition to teaching at Kellogg, Dr. Jain has served as a visiting professor of marketing at Sasin Graduate Institute of Business Administration, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, since 1989 and at Nijenrode University, Netherlands Business School, since 1995. He also serves as visiting professor of marketing at the Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, India. Dr. Jain is also a member of the board of directors for Deere & Company, Northern Trust Corporation, Reliance Industries Ltd., India, and Global Logistic Properties Ltd., Singapore.    top of page

Subhash Jain

Subhash Jain
Professor and Director for Center for International Business Education and Research, University of Connecticut

Co-Author: Building the Case for Graduate Management Education: Ensuring and Enhancing Future Value (Chapter 1)

Subhash C. Jain is Professor of International Marketing, Director of the Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), and Director of the GE Global Learning Center (GEGLC) at the University of Connecticut’s School of Business. His teaching, consulting, and research activities include marketing strategy and multinational marketing. Dr. Subhash Jain is the author of more than 100 publications, including 12 books: Marketing Planning and Strategy, International Marketing, Export Strategy, Market Evolution in Developing Countries, Handbook of Research in International Marketing, Toward a Global Business Confederation, Multinational Corporations and Poverty Reduction, Emerging Economies and the Transformation of International Business, Global Business Negotiations, and others.

Dr. Subhash Jain has presented seminars, both in the United States and other countries, on various marketing topics, including marketing segmentation and positioning, marketing strategy, export strategy and global branding. He has offered seminars for the International Trade Center (WTO/UNCTAD) in Geneva and served as a visiting faculty at the Graduate School of Business Administration Zurich in its executive MBA program and the International University of Geneva. He has consulted with such organizations as Xerox Corporation, Aetna Life and Casualty, United Technologies, Mead Corporation, General Motors, NCR, Timex Corporation, Heineken, Unilever, Pitney Bowes, and Corning Glass. He has advised government agencies in Malaysia, Chile, India, Pakistan, St. Lucia, Mexico, Iran, Kenya, and Indonesia on their trade problems.    top of page

Jikyeong Kang

Jikyeong Kang
Professor and Director of Postgraduate Centre, Manchester Business School

Co-Author: Managing Aspirations, Resources, and Cost Structures in Differentiating Constraints (Chapter 3)

Jikyeong Kang is currently Professor of Marketing and Director of the DBA Program at Manchester Business School (MBS), United Kingdom. A native of Korea, she spent 18 years in the United States, nine of which on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. During the early years of her career at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, she was elected as a member of the prestigious Teaching Academy. She has held visiting appointments at numerous business schools, including CEIBS, ESSEC, RSM, HEC, and Sogang University.

Dr. Kang was director of MBA programs for six years at MBS, providing strategic leadership for a suite of MBA programs. During her tenure, the MBS full-time MBA program ranking went up from 48th (2002) to 22nd in the world in 2007, according to the Financial Times ranking reports.

Dr. Kang is a recipient of various research grants and has done consultancy work for many international organizations, including Adelphi International, the Royal Bank of Scotland, Hilti, Littlewoods, and Sears. She received several national and international awards for her research and actively publishes her work in various academic research journals. In addition, she has presented numerous papers at industry and academic conferences throughout the United States and Europe. In 2005, she was highly commended in the public sector for Asian Women of Achievement Award in the United Kingdom.    top of page

Amy Kenworthy

Amy L. Kenworthy
Professor and Founding Director of LEAP Centre, Bond University

Co-Author: Overlooked and Unappreciated: What Research Tells Us About How Teaching Must Change (Chapter 6)

Amy L. Kenworthy is the Founding Director of the Centre for Applied Research in Learning, Engagement, Andragogy, and Pedagogy (LEAP) and Professor of Management at the School of Business at Bond University in Queensland, Australia. Dr. Kenworthy’s primary research and scholarship interests focus on the interrelated areas of service learning, community engagement, and experiential education practices. She has served as guest editor for special issues on service learning in the Academy of Management Learning & Education, the Journal of Management Education, the International Journal of Case Method Research & Application, and the International Journal of Organizational Analysis and has published numerous articles in leading academic journals. Her recent publications include two edited books—Innovations in Teaching and Learning and Community Engagement in Contemporary Legal Education (coedited with Patrick Keyzer and Gail Wilson).

Dr. Kenworthy has received numerous teaching awards, including an Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) Award for Teaching Excellence and three ALTC Citations for Contributions to Student Learning. She is the first international recipient of the Organizational Behavior Teaching Society’s New Educator Award and the only faculty member at Bond University who has twice received the university’s Vice Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence. She has presented at more than 75 refereed conference presentations, served as a keynote speaker at multiple international forums, and worked as a consultant to numerous business school-based service learning programs around the world.

Dr. Kenworthy is associate editor for the Academy of Management Learning & Education (AMLE) and serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of Management Education and the Review of Business. She is an award-winning reviewer for AMLE and the AOM conferences including the Organizational Behavior Teaching Conference (OBTC) and the Management Education Division (MED) of the Academy of Management annual meeting, and has twice chaired the MED track for the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management (ANZAM) conference.    top of page

Rakesh Khurana

Rakesh Khurana
Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Harvard Business School

Co-Author: Intellectual Signatures: Impact on Relevance and Doctoral Programs (Chapter 4)

Rakesh Khurana is the Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at the Harvard Business School. He is also the master of Cabot House at Harvard College. He teaches a doctoral seminar on management and markets and MBA courses in corporate governance in and leadership. Professor Khurana received his BS from Cornell University and his AM (sociology) and PhD in organization behavior from Harvard University. Prior to attending graduate school, he worked in sales and marketing as a founding member of Cambridge Technology Partners.

He has published articles on corporate governance in the Harvard Business Review and Sloan Management Review and several books, including one published in 2002 on the CEO labor market, Searching for a Corporate Savior: The Irrational Quest for Charismatic CEOs.

His book, From Higher Aims to Hired Hands: The Social Transformation of American Business Schools and the Unfulfilled Promise of Management as a Profession, chronicles the evolution of management as a profession, with particular focus on the institutional development of the MBA. From Higher Aims to Hired Hands received the American Sociological Association’s Max Weber Book Award in 2008 for most outstanding contribution to scholarship in the past two years. Dr. Khurana’s book also won the 2007 Best Professional/Scholarly Publishing Book in Business, Finance and Management award from the Association of American Publishers.    top of page

Frederick Morgeson

Frederick P. Morgeson
Professor, Michigan State University

Co-Author: Reclaiming Quality in Graduate Education (Chapter 8)

Frederick P. Morgeson is Professor of Management and Valade Research Scholar at the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. He received his PhD in industrial and organizational psychology from Purdue University. Dr. Morgeson teaches and does research in human resource management and organizational behavior. His research has focused on four distinct areas. The first involves his continuing interest in leadership, particularly with respect to the role of leadership in self-managing teams and the nature of the relationship between leaders and followers. His second area of research examines fundamental questions about the nature of work, including how work is structured and how people perceive their work, which he has explored in a series of studies in the job analysis, work design, and work teams areas. Dr. Morgeson has also studied the effectiveness and consequences of different selection techniques and has explored issues of theory development and sought to produce integrative research in the substantive research areas of his interest.

Dr. Morgeson has published his research in numerous top-tier management and psychology journals, coauthored the leading job analysis textbook (Job Analysis: Methods, Research, and Applications for Human Resource Management), authored or coauthored numerous book chapters, and presented his research at universities and conferences around the world. He is editor of Personnel Psychology and the Annual Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, is on the editorial board of the Academy of Management Review, and is serving a five-year term as executive officer for the Academy of Management’s human resources division. He was formerly a member of the Academy’s HR division executive committee. He also is associate editor of Personnel Psychology, a member of the Society for Human Resource Management Foundation’s board of directors, and has served on the editorial boards of the Annual Review of Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and the Journal of Management. Dr. Morgeson also received the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology in Applied Psychology.    top of page

Denis Nayden

Denis J. Nayden
Managing Partner, Oak Hill Capital Partners

Co-Author: Building the Case for Graduate Management Education: Ensuring and Enhancing Future Value (Chapter 1)

Denis J. Nayden is a Managing Partner of Oak Hill Capital, a private equity firm in which Robert M. Bass is the lead investor. At Oak Hill Capital, Mr. Nayden heads the industry groups focused on investments in basic industries and co-heads the business & financial services team. Currently, he represents Oak Hill Capital on a number of boards in which Oak Hill Capital directly invests. He chairs the boards of directors of Avolon Aerospace Limited and Firth Rixson Limited and he is on the board of Accretive Healthcare and Jacobson Companies. Formerly, he was chaired the boards of directors of Primus International, RSC Equipment Rental, and Duane Reade, Inc., and a member of the board of Genpact Limited, all prior Oak Hill Capital investments.

Prior to joining Oak Hill in 2003, he was chair and chief executive officer of GE Capital, where he was responsible for 20 separate businesses representing $555 billion of aggregate assets and 90,000 employees in 35 countries. During his 26-year tenure at General Electric Co., Mr. Nayden also served as chief operating officer (1994–2000); executive vice president (1989–1994); senior vice president and general manager in the structured finance group (1987–1989); vice president and general manager in the corporate finance group (1987–1989); and marketing administrator for air/rail financing and held other positions from 1977 to 1987.

Mr. Nayden also serves on the board of directors of buildOn (a nonprofit organization). He has served on the University of Connecticut’s (UConn) board of trustees since 2001, currently sits on UConn’s compensation committee and is chairs UConn’s audit committee. Mr. Nayden has a long involvement with UConn, including as member of the university’s foundation board and School of Business board of advisors. He co-chaired UConn’s first ever capital campaign which raised more than $400MM. Mr. Nayden earned a BA degree in English, magna cum laude, in 1976 and an MBA in finance in 1977 from the University of Connecticut.    top of page

Lyman Porter

Lyman W. Porter
Professor Emeritus, University of California, Irvine

Co-Author: The Change Imperative (Introduction)

Lyman W. Porter is Professor Emeritus of Management in the Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and was formerly dean of that school. Prior to joining UCI in 1967, he served on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, and was a visiting professor at Yale University. Currently, he serves as a member of the board of trustees of the American University of Armenia. He has also been a visiting professor at Hong Kong University and has served as an external examiner for the National University of Singapore.

Professor Porter is a past president of the Academy of Management and received that organization’s “Scholarly Contributions to Management” Award in 1983 and its “Distinguished Management Educator” Award in 1994. He previously served three terms on the board of directors of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Professor Porter is the author, or coauthor, of 11 books and more than 90 articles on topics relating to the field of management. His 1988 book (with Lawrence McKibbin), Management Education and Development (McGraw-Hill), reported the findings of a nationwide US study of business school education and post-degree management development.    top of page

Robert Rubin

Robert S. Rubin
Associate Professor, DePaul University

Co-Author: Reclaiming Quality in Graduate Education (Chapter 8)

Robert S. Rubin is Associate Professor of Management in the Driehaus College of Business at DePaul University. He has published his work in leading academic journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Personnel Psychology, The Leadership Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Business Ethics Quarterly, Journal of Business Ethics, Human Resources Management, Journal of Management Education, and Academy of Management Learning & Education. Professor Rubin’s research also has been profiled in national publications, including Bloomberg Businessweek, Financial Times, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. Currently, Dr. Rubin is an editorial board member of the Academy of Management Learning & Education, and Leadership and Organizational Studies. Dr. Rubin coauthored a management skills textbook, Managing Organizational Behavior: What Great Managers Know and Do.

Professor Rubin’s research regarding graduate management education has focused primarily on the content of MBA curriculum and its relevancy to managerial work. His recent work has also explored issues of accreditation and assessment as well as MBA program quality. His research on MBA programs has been supported in part by three grants from the GMAC Management Education Research Institute. In addition to his work on graduate management education, Professor Rubin has pursued research into aspects of leadership, managerial assessment and development, citizenship behavior, and emotions at work.

Beyond his academic work, he has been an active human capital consultant to a variety of industries engaged in improving employee selection, leadership assessment and development, change management, and executive coaching.    top of page

Sara Rynes-Weller

Sara L. Rynes-Weller
Professor, University of Iowa

Co-Author: Curriculum Matters: Toward a More Holistic Graduate Management Education (Chapter 5)

Sara L. Rynes is the John F. Murray Professor of Management and Organization in the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Her research has appeared in leading management journals such as the Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Harvard Business Review, and Academy of Management Learning & Education. She was editor-in-chief of the Academy of Management Journal from 2005 to 2007 and served on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Human Resource Management, and the Academy of Management Learning & Education.

Dr. Rynes’ research interests focus on human resource strategy, recruitment, compensation, academic–practitioner relationships, and management education. She has written about the challenges of teaching behavioral coursework in business schools, the deprofessionalization of business schools, the current state of the research literature on management teaching, the extent to which management professors teach evidence-based management, how organizational behavior is taught in MBA programs, and whether or not adding a management major to a functional area major (such as finance or accounting) improves a student’s chances of receiving a job interview.

Dr. Rynes is a fellow of the Academy of Management, the American Psychological Association, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. She received the Academy of Management’s 2006 Herbert G. Heneman Career Achievement Award for Research in Human Resource Management; the 2011 Dutch HRM Network Research Award, and the 2011 Michael R. Losey Human Resource Management Research Award from the Society for Human Resource Management, the SHRM Foundation, and the HR Certification Institute. She has received research grants from the US Army Research Institute, the SHRM Foundation, Cornell’s Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies, the Management Education Research Institute, and the US Department of Labor.

Dr. Rynes teaches courses in human resource management, organizational change, research methods, compensation, quality management, and sustainability. She is a former chair of the department of management and organization at the University of Iowa and was the 2013 Presidential Lecturer for the university. She has consulted with companies such as IBM, Corning, Kodak, AT&T, Citigroup, Pearson, Merrill Lynch, 3-M, Kraft, and CIGNA. Dr. Rynes received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin and previously held faculty positions at Cornell University and the University of Minnesota.    top of page

John-Christopher Spender

John-Christopher (JC) Spender
Visiting Professor of the Department of People Management and Organisation, ESADE

Co-Author: Intellectual Signatures: Impact on Relevance and Doctoral Programs (Chapter 4)

John-Christopher Spender is currently a Visiting Professor at Lund University, Sweden; ESADE, Spain; and at Cranfield University School of Management, the Open University Business School, and Leeds University Business School, all in the United Kingdom. He is also a faculty member and Chairman of The Board for the International School of Management in Paris, France. Trained initially as a nuclear engineer, Dr. Spender worked for Rolls-Royce & Associates at the plant for British nuclear submarines from 1960 to1965. He later joined IBM (UK), working from 1965 to 1970 as a large account team manager, and later worked in London as an investment banker until 1988.

Dr. Spender completed his PhD in strategic management at the Manchester Business School. His thesis won the 1980 Academy of Management AT Kearney Prize and was later published as Industry Recipes (Blackwell, 1989). After serving on the faculty at various universities, he retired in 2003 as dean of the School of Technology & Business at State University of New York/Fashion Institute of Technology. In addition to ongoing visiting appointments, he served as the 2007–2008 Fulbright Research Chair at Queen’s University, Canada.

Dr. Spender’s current research interests include theorizing firms, managing, and markets under conditions of Knightian uncertainty. He has authored or coauthored 60 books on the history of management education, business strategy, and knowledge management, including Strategic Conversations (forthcoming), and Confronting Managerialism: How the Business Elite and Their Schools Threw Our Lives Out of Balance (2011).    top of page

Andrew Stark

Andrew Stark
Professor, Manchester Business School

Co-Author: Managing Aspirations, Resources, and Cost Structures in Differentiating Constraints (Chapter 3)

Andrew W. Stark is the Coutts Professor of Accounting and Finance at the Manchester Business School. He has held this position since 1996, having previously held faculty positions at the Yale School of Management, the University of Essex, the University of Ulster at Jordanstown, the University of Maryland at College Park, and the University of Manchester. While at the Manchester Business School, he served for six years as the director of the full-time MBA program and is currently head of the division of accounting and finance.

Dr. Stark has held various leadership roles within his profession including a term as chair of the British Accounting and Finance Association. He chaired the Quality Assurance Agency Subject Benchmarking Group responsible for formulating a subject benchmarking statement for undergraduate degrees in accounting and finance in the United Kingdom. He was a member of various UK Research Assessment Exercise committees, including the 1996 and 2001 committees for accounting and finance, and the 2001 committee for business and management. He chaired the committee for accounting and finance in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

He has published more than 40 papers in refereed research journals, is a past editor of the British Accounting Review, and current editor of the Journal of Business Finance and Accounting. He has a BA in mathematics from Cambridge University, and an MBA and PhD from the Manchester Business School.